Origin of Qi Qong


Taking care of one’s body means doing gymnastics that keeps the body and mind healthy at any age and nothing better than our Asian friends to teach us that:

The founder of this method lived in the 2nd century BC under the Han dynasty, it is the doctor Hua Tuo.

The Qi Gong (“Mastery of energy”) is the Chinese health gymnastics of the Chinese tradition. It resembles Tai Chi Chuan, which is a martial art.

Qi Gong is taught in Taoist monasteries, as well as to Shaolin martial artists and others. As therapeutic gymnastics, Qi Gong is taught in China in hospitals.

During a Qi Gong session, the practitioner is invited to slow movements comparable to slow motion dance. The practitioner is also trained to model his breathing and to focus on the circulation of energy in the body.

The results, proven by numerous scientific experiments around the world on stress, show relaxing and serene effects and an improvement of the physiological parameters of relaxation and immunity. Above all, Qi Gong is preventive, used as an art of living to remain Zen and to be even more so every day.

Qi Gong is also used to improve health in cardiovascular problems and hypertension, chronic degenerative or infectious diseases, has a traditional reputation for slowing down aging and has proven itself in preventing falls among the elderly. It helps children to be calmer and promotes attention, thus improving learning. It is indicated to athletes to increase their performance and decrease their recovery time after exercise. It prepares women for childbirth. Qi Gong is generally recommended to all those who wish to manage their stress and live more relaxed.

Taking care of your body requires gymnastics that preserves the health of body and mind at any age and nothing better than our Asian friends to teach us this:

The founder of this method lived in the 2nd century BC under the Han dynasty, it is the doctor Hua Tuo.